Silver Creek Leather Co., LLC
Manufacturer and Supplier for all Your Leathercraft Needs
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Speedy Stitcher

Speedy Stitcher

 

a 100 year tradition

The Speedy Stitcher sewing awl has been a staple in American households since it was patented in 1909. This handy sewing tool is a tool used by professionals and do-it yourselfers such as leather crafters, sailors, boaters, horse lovers, outdoor enthusiasts, athletes and coaches, just to mention a few. This is an all-in-one sturdy hand tool with our signature high-tensile waxed polyester thread and diamond point needles that is designed to sew a tight lock stitch, just like a sewing machine, with ease. Customers around the world call it, “indispensable”.

This tool can be spotted in a variety of places from a hiker’s backpack, various repair kits for everything from bouncy houses to baseball gloves, or in a leather crafter’s shop. This quick stitching tool is self-contained; all needed components are stored within the awl. To learn more about how to use the tool check out our instructions and videos on the Speedy Stitcher website.

Speedy Stitcher Products

The Speedy Stitcher product line includes the sewing awl, sewing kits, replacement thread and additional needles. The Speedy Stitcher Sewing Awl and its replacement accessories are distributed across the globe, available in craft stores, leather specialty retailers, hardware stores and even online. Also available on Amazon.com.

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Proudly made in america

The Speedy Stitcher was originally patented in 1909 by Francis Stewart of Central Massachusetts. Mr. Stewart, a prolific inventor, introduced the Speedy Stitcher to the marketplace where it has remained in constant demand for over a century. Today, Silver Creek Leather Company is proud to continue the Speedy Stitcher legacy and manufacture the same high-quality sewing awl consumers have come to expect. 

Every Speedy Stitcher is Made in the USA from component parts that are sourced in the United States - the wood handles are from Maine, the metal bobbins and caps are from Massachusetts and thread from the Carolinas. Every awl is assembled and packed by hand, in Southern Indiana.